List of all posts by Peter Maag (7)

Microsoft SRT Alliance
September 14, 2018

Microsoft Joins SRT Open Source Project

Ever since we made SRT (Secure Reliable Transport) available to the open source community on Github last year, we’ve witnessed exponential growth in the number of video streaming solutions and applications leveraging SRT. With more live content and events being covered by broadcasters, video streaming services, and enterprises, SRT has become the de facto standard for secure and reliable [...]

Alternative to RTMP
January 11, 2018

Today’s Alternatives to RTMP for Getting Your Streams to the Internet

We all know that Flash is virtually dead for stream distribution to desktop players, however, RTMP, the basis of video distribution for Flash, still remains very much in use for stream delivery to the cloud. Let’s take a look at some of the challenges that RTMP presents for contribution streaming in “the first mile” – getting your stream from the [...]

Unicast, broadcast, and multicast
June 16, 2017

A Quick Primer on Broadcast, Unicast, and Multicast

Transporting video has never been easier thanks to the multitude of networking technologies on the market. It wasn’t that long ago that our televisions only had a handful of channels, or that we would dial into a conference call for a company all-hands meeting. Here’s an overview of the different video distribution technologies that exist, and how they work. [...]

Red Hot Chili Peppers 360 degree live stream
September 9, 2016

Haivision and Sales Cube Power Red Hot Chili Peppers’ 4K 360-degree VR Live Stream

Hot out of IBC 2016, we just announced that we helped power the first live 4K 360-degree live VR stream in Germany for Deutsche Telekom’s Street Gigs Red Hot Chili Peppers’ concert. The event was powered by our KB 4K HEVC/H.264 encoder – an essential part of the live video workflow – streaming the Nokia OZO Professional Virtual Reality camera feed to more than 675,000 viewers on YouTube [...]

Internet broadcast backhaul
August 18, 2016

Harnessing the Internet for Broadcast Backhaul

It is estimated that by 2019 video will represent 80 percent of the world’s internet traffic. While a lot of that traffic is on-demand consumption, a growing percentage is also live video. As viewers, we expect to have access to more and more content online and that means busy times for broadcasters. To meet demand for more content without significantly [...]